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First 1000 Days Australia

First 1000 Days Australia – the Australian Model of the international 1,000 Days movement – aims to provide a coordinated, comprehensive strategy to strengthen Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families so they can address their children’s needs from pre‐conception to two years of age, thereby laying the best foundation for their future health and wellbeing.

First 1000 Days Australia uses the period from pre-conception to the age of two, as a time to:

  1. Build resilience – Support families, organisations and communities to better prepare for, respond to and transform from disruption in Australia and elsewhere in the world.
  2. Learn and innovate – Generate important new knowledge that addresses some of the most complex issues facing our families, and catalyse innovation through cross-cultural and interdisciplinary exchange.
  3. Lead regional initiatives – Foster high levels of commitment to and alignment with the vision, values, resources and infrastructure to support family strengthening before and during the First 1000 Days.
  4. Generate and use evidence for impact – Produce robust, applicable research evidence about what works, promote the implementation of high-impact and cost-effective programs, and enable the capacity to influence the adoption and scale of such interventions.

First 1000 Days Australia is premised on the family remaining the primary and preferred site for developing and protecting culture and identity in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. As such, the work is guided by a First 1000 Days Australia Council made up of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders, researchers, community members, front-line workers and policy makers. The Council ensures First 1000 Days Australia endorsed work is led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and employs Indigenous methods of knowledge generation.

Founded on partnerships to promote collective impact, the Australian Model takes a multigenerational view of the family and is guided by a multidisciplinary Research Advisory Committee as well as other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars.